• enquiries@oakleighmanor.co.uk
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Japanese Inspired Garden Design in Kent, Essex & London

Japanese Inspired Gardens

Simplistic and tranquil, Japanese Gardens are a wonderful retreat for reflection and relaxation. The aesthetics and style of Japanese Gardens have historic influence dating back thousands of years and have evolved throughout the decades to become an incredibly influential force in the Garden Design Industry, and are a source of admiration and inspiration for many Designers. Although there are so many variations to a Japanese Garden, there 3 essential elements we can use to incorporate this ideology into our own garden designs: Stone, Plants, and Water.

Creating a zen Japanese Inspired Garden Landscape

Rocks, Stone & Gravel

Stones and rocks are used in Japanese Gardens to create paths and represent mountains. Whether large or small, rocks and stones are a great way to create a naturalistic appearance. They can be small clusters of rocks or larger prominently shaped centerpieces. Gravel, raked into different patterns, can also be used to cleverly represent the flow of water. Commonly used stones are:

  • Granite
  • Slate
  • Limestone
  • Raked gravel

Water

Water is a very desirable feature in the creation of a Japanese Garden as it promotes a serene and tranquil atmosphere, ideal for meditation and reflection. Water, in Japanese Culture, symbolises renewal, calm, wonder, and the flow of life. Water can be incorporated into a garden in many different ways, be it big or small:

  • Koi Pond
  • Cascading rock waterfall
  • Bubbling fountain
  • Stone water feature

Plants

Plants, in Japanese Culture, are associated with moving thoughts and the universal forms of life. Not only that but they provide colour amongst the other natural features in the garden, such as rocks & gravel. Evergreen plants are used to provide year-round interest, and trees, such as Cherry & Japanese Maples, are used to provide intense colours throughout different seasons. Bamboo is commonly associated with Japanese Gardens, as it creates sounds and movement as the wind blows, adding another sensory ingredient to the garden. Some other suggestions include:

  • Mosses
  • Ferns
  • Rhododendrons
  • Cherry Trees
  • Japanese Maples
  • Bamboo

Rocks, Stone & Gravel

Stones and rocks are used in Japanese Gardens to create paths and represent mountains. Whether large or small, rocks and stones are a great way to create a naturalistic appearance. They can be small clusters of rocks or larger prominently shaped centerpieces. Gravel, raked into different patterns, can also be used to cleverly represent the flow of water. Commonly used stones are:

  • Granite
  • Slate
  • Limestone
  • Raked gravel

Water

Water is a very desirable feature in the creation of a Japanese Garden as it promotes a serene and tranquil atmosphere, ideal for meditation and reflection. Water, in Japanese Culture, symbolises renewal, calm, wonder, and the flow of life. Water can be incorporated into a garden in many different ways, be it big or small:

  • Koi Pond
  • Cascading rock waterfall
  • Bubbling fountain
  • Stone water feature

Plants

Plants, in Japanese Culture, are associated with moving thoughts and the universal forms of life. Not only that but they provide colour amongst the other natural features in the garden, such as rocks & gravel. Evergreen plants are used to provide year-round interest, and trees, such as Cherry & Japanese Maples, are used to provide intense colours throughout different seasons. Bamboo is commonly associated with Japanese Gardens, as it creates sounds and movement as the wind blows, adding another sensory ingredient to the garden. Some other suggestions include:

  • Mosses
  • Ferns
  • Rhododendrons
  • Cherry Trees
  • Japanese Maples
  • Bamboo

Our Recent Projects

What to Expect

If you would like your garden redesigned by our Design team, simply complete the enquiry form or call the team today. No fees are charged for an initial chat or for most initial site meetings. We will prepare you a written “Design Fee Proposal” prior to proceeding with any charges to you.

So firstly, we will need a little bit of your time to find out a little about your ideas, then we would look to arrange an Initial Site Meeting with one of our designers, at a time convenient to you, preferably at the site location or to view drawings of developing scheme projects. At the meeting, we will listen to your requirements, then suggest the some ideas and provide advice for your project. This will take approximately one hour of your time.

Once we understand your Design requirement, we will  submit a Design Fee Proposal for you to consider with no obligation, this will state our Design Fees and the stages of design work we will carry out for you. Our service is tailored to suit you, your home and your requirements so your Design Fee proposal will specify the correct type of survey required, whether you will need to invest into an optional  Concept Design stage, and the appropriate stages of the process.

Each Design Package offers the most suitable survey type, a client brief, a conceptual stage if required, finally we will create a large format Master Design together with a Garden Installation Quotation & Specification to construct the new design.

We also provide planning guidance for all projects that require local authority or other permissions.

Other Services from Oakleigh Manor

The Oakleigh Manor group provides a huge range of services geared for a beautiful Garden or Landscape, Driveways, Garden Lighting and Illumination, Drainage and/or Irrigation systems, Swimming Pools, Artificial Grass Surfaces, Resin Gravel Surfaces and more in Kent and the South East of England.

Planting Schemes

Garden Joinery

Landscaping

Like what you see? Take the next step

Simply complete our online Enquiry Form or call the Oakleigh Manor team on 0800 023 1310 to discuss your requirements. Our team can guide you through the options available for all our services, provide initial budgets or arrange an Initial Site Visit from one of our friendly team.